Standards Mapping

Filament Games builds interactive learning experience based on education's latest learning standards and goals. The standards in our games come from next generation Science Standards (2013), Common Core State Standards Initiatives for Math and Literacy, and Benchmarks for Science Literacy.

 

Dr. Guts

Next Generation Science Standards

  • MS-LS1-3

    Use argument supported by evidence for how the body is a system of interacting subsystems composed of groups of cells.
  • LS1.A: Structure and Function

    • In multicellular organisms, the body is a system of multiple interacting subsystems. These subsystems are groups of cells that work together to form tissues and organs that are specialized for particular body functions.

Common Core

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3

    Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4

    Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

Benchmarks for Science Literacy

  • 6C/M1

    Organs and organ systems are composed of cells and help to provide all cells with basic needs.
  • 6C/M3

    To burn food for the release of energy stored in it, oxygen must be supplied to cells, and carbon dioxide removed. Lungs take in oxygen for the combustion of food and eliminate the carbon dioxide produced. The urinary system disposes of dissolved waste molecules, the intestinal tract removes solid wastes, and the skin and lungs aid in the transfer of thermal energy from the body. The circulatory system moves all these substances to or from cells where they are needed or produced, responding to changing demands.

 

You Make Me Sick!

Common Core

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3

    Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4

    Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

Benchmarks for Science Literacy

  • 6E/M3

    Viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites may infect the human body and interfere with normal body functions. A person can catch a cold many times because there are many varieties of cold viruses that cause similar symptoms.
  • 6E/M4

    White blood cells engulf invaders or produce antibodies that attack them or mark them for killing by other white cells. The antibodies produced will remain and can fight off subsequent invaders of the same kind.
  • 6E/M6** (BSL)

    Specific kinds of germs cause specific diseases.
  • 6E/M7** (BSL)

    Vaccines induce the body to build immunity to a disease without actually causing the disease itself.

 

Fossil Forensics

Next Generation Science Standards

  • MS-LS4-1

    Analyze and interpret data for patterns in the fossil record that document the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of life forms throughout the history of life on Earth under the assumption that natural laws operate today as in the past.
  • MS-LS4-2

    Apply scientific ideas to construct an explanation for the anatomical similarities and differences among modern organisms and between modern and fossil organisms to infer evolutionary relationships.
  • LS4.A: Evidence of Common Ancestry and Diversity

    • The collection of fossils and their placement in chronological order (e.g., through the location of the sedimentary layers in which they are found or through radioactive dating) is known as the fossil record. It documents the existence, diversity, extinction, and change of many life forms throughout the history of life on Earth. (MS-LS4-1)
    • Anatomical similarities and differences between various organisms living today and between them and organisms in the fossil record, enable the reconstruction of evolutionary history and the inference of lines of evolutionary descent. (MS-LS4-2)

Common Core

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3

    Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4

    Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

Benchmarks for Science Literacy

  • 5F/M1

    Small differences between parents and offspring can accumulate (through selective breeding) in successive generations so that descendants are very different from their ancestors.
  • 5F/M3a

    Many thousands of layers of sedimentary rock provide evidence for the long history of the earth and for the long history of changing life forms whose remains are found in the rocks.

 

Cell Command

Next Generation Science Standards

  • MS-LS1-2

    Develop and use a model to describe the function of a cell as a whole and ways parts of cells contribute to the function.
  • LS1.A: Structure and Function

    • Within cells, special structures are responsible for particular functions, and the cell membrane forms the boundary that controls what enters and leaves the cell. (MS-LS1-2)

Common Core

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3

    Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4

    Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

Benchmarks for Science Literacy

  • 5C/M1a

    All living things are composed of cells, from just one to many millions, whose details usually are visible only through a microscope.
  • 5C/M2a

    Cells repeatedly divide to make more cells for growth and repair.
  • 5C/M3a

    Within cells, many of the basic functions of organisms—such as extracting energy from food and getting rid of waste—are carried out.

 

Crazy Plant Shop

Next Generation Science Standards

  • MS-LS3-2

    Develop and use a model to describe why asexual reproduction results in offspring with identical genetic information and sexual reproduction results in offspring with genetic variation.
  • MS-LS4-5

    Gather and synthesize information about the technologies that have changed the way humans influence the inheritance of desired traits in organisms.
  • LS1.B: Growth and Development of Organisms

    • Organisms reproduce, either sexually or asexually, and transfer their genetic information to their offspring.

    LS3.A: Inheritance of Traits

    • Variations of inherited traits between parent and offspring arise from genetic differences that result from the subset of chromosomes (and therefore genes) inherited.

    LS3.B: Variation of Traits

    • In sexually reproducing organisms, each parent contributes half of the genes acquired (at random) by the offspring. Individuals have two of each chromosome and hence two alleles of each gene, one acquired from each parent. These versions may be identical or may differ from each other.

    LS4.B: Natural Selection

    • In artificial selection, humans have the capacity to influence certain characteristics of organisms by selective breeding. One can choose desired parental traits determined by genes, which are then passed on to offspring.

Common Core

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3

    Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4

    Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

Benchmarks for Science Literacy

  • 5B/M1a

    In some kinds of organisms, all the genes come from a single parent.
  • 5B/M1b

    In organisms that have two sexes, typically half of the genes will come from each parent
  • 5B/M3

    New varieties of cultivated plants and domestic animals have resulted from selective breeding for particular traits.

 

Reach For the Sun

Next Generation Science Standards

  • MS-LS1-4

    Use argument based on empirical evidence and scientific reasoning to support an explanation for how characteristic animal behaviors and specialized plant structures affect the probability of successful reproduction of animals and plants respectively.
  • MS-LS1-6

    Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.
  • LS1.B: Growth and Development of Organisms

    • Plants reproduce in a variety of ways, sometimes depending on animal behavior and specialized features for reproduction. (MS-LS1-4)

    LS1.C: Organization for Matter and Energy Flow in Organisms

    • Plants, algae (including phytoplankton), and many microorganisms use the energy from light to make sugars (food) from carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and water through the process of photosynthesis, which also releases oxygen. These sugars can be used immediately or stored for growth or later use. (MS-LS1-6)

Common Core

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3

    Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4

    Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

Benchmarks for Science Literacy

  • 5A/M2

    Animals and plants have a great variety of body plans and internal structures that contribute to their being able to make or find food and reproduce.

 

Backyard Engineers

Next Generation Science Standards

  • MS-ETS1-1

    Define the criteria and constraints of a design problem with sufficient precision to ensure a successful solution, taking into account relevant scientific principles and potential impacts on people and the natural environment that may limit possible solutions.
  • MS-ETS1-2

    Evaluate competing design solutions using a systematic process to determine how well they meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.
  • MS-ETS1-3

    Analyze data from tests to determine similarities and differences among several design solutions to identify the best characteristics of each that can be combined into a new solution to better meet the criteria for success.
  • MS-ETS1-4

    Develop a model to generate data for iterative testing and modification of a proposed object, tool, or process such that an optimal design can be achieved.
  • ETS1.A: Defining and Delimiting Engineering Problems

    • The more precisely a design task’s criteria and constraints can be defined, the more likely it is that the designed solution will be successful. Specification of constraints includes consideration of scientific principles and other relevant knowledge that are likely to limit possible solutions. (MS-ETS1-1)

    ETS1.B: Developing Possible Solutions

    • A solution needs to be tested, and then modified on the basis of the test results, in order to improve it. (MS-ETS1-4)
    • There are systematic processes for evaluating solutions with respect to how well they meet the criteria and constraints of a problem. (MS-ETS1-2), (MS-ETS1-3)
    • Sometimes parts of different solutions can be combined to create a solution that is better than any of its predecessors. (MS-ETS1-3)
    • Models of all kinds are important for testing solutions. (MS-ETS1-4)

    ETS1.C: Optimizing the Design Solution

    • Although one design may not perform the best across all tests, identifying the characteristics of the design that performed the best in each test can provide useful information for the redesign process—that is, some of those characteristics may be incorporated into the new design. (MSETS1-3)
    • The iterative process of testing the most promising solutions and modifying what is proposed on the basis of the test results leads to greater refinement and ultimately to an optimal solution. (MSETS1-4)
  • MS-PS2-2 *

    Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.
  • MS-PS3-1 *

    Construct and interpret graphical displays of data to describe the relationships of kinetic energy to the mass of an object and to the speed of an object.
  • MS-PS3-5 *

    Construct, use, and present arguments to support the claim that when the kinetic energy of an object changes, energy is transferred to or from the object.
  • PS3.A: Definitions of Energy *

    • Motion energy is properly called kinetic energy; it is proportional to the mass of the moving object and grows with the square of its speed. (MS-PS3-1)
    • A system of objects may also contain stored (potential) energy, depending on their relative positions. (MS-PS3-2)

    PS3.B: Conservation of Energy and Energy Transfer *

    • When the motion energy of an object changes, there is inevitably some other change in energy at the same time. (MS-PS3-5)

    PS3.C: Relationship Between Energy and Forces *

    • When two objects interact, each one exerts a force on the other that can cause energy to be transferred to or from the object. (MS-PS3-2)
  • * These standards are met with the included curriculum materials.

Common Core

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3

    Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4

    Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.6-8.1

    Write arguments focused on discipline-specific content.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.WHST.6-8.2

    Write informative/explanatory texts, including the narration of historical events, scientific procedures/experiments, or technical processes. RST.6-8.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts, attending to the precise details of explanations or descriptions. (MS-PS3-1)

Benchmarks for Science Literacy

  • 3A/M3

    Engineers, architects, and others who engage in design and technology use scientific knowledge to solve practical problems. They also usually have to take human values and limitations into account.
  • 3B/M4a

    Systems fail because they have faulty or poorly matched parts, are used in ways that exceed what was intended by the design, or were poorly designed to begin with.
  • 3C/M8

    Scientific laws, engineering principles, properties of materials, and construction techniques must be taken into account when designing engineering solutions to problems

 

Motion Force

Next Generation Science Standards

  • PS2.A: Forces and Motion

    • For any pair of interacting objects, the force exerted by the first object on the second object is equal in strength to the force that the second object exerts on the first, but in the opposite direction (Newton’s third law). (MS-PS2-1)
    • The motion of an object is determined by the sum of the forces acting on it; if the total force on the object is not zero, its motion will change. The greater the mass of the object, the greater the force needed to achieve the same change in motion. For any given object, a larger force causes a larger change in motion. All positions of objects and the directions of forces and motions must be described in an arbitrarily chosen reference frame and arbitrarily chosen units of size. In order to share information with other people, these choices must also be shared. (MS-PS2-2)
  • MS-PS2-1

    Apply Newton’s Third Law to design a solution to a problem involving the motion of two colliding objects.
  • MS-PS2-2

    Plan an investigation to provide evidence that the change in an object’s motion depends on the sum of the forces on the object and the mass of the object.

Common Core

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3

    Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4

    Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

Benchmarks for Science Literacy

  • 4F/M3a

    An unbalanced force acting on an object changes its speed or direction of motion, or both.

 

Planet Mechanic

Next Generation Science Standards

  • MS-ESS1-1

    Develop and use a model of the Earth-sun-moon system to describe the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the sun and moon, and seasons.
  • MS-ESS1-2

    Develop and use a model to describe the role of gravity in the motions within galaxies and the solar system.
  • ESS1.A: The Universe and Its Stars

    • Patterns of the apparent motion of the sun, the moon, and stars in the sky can be observed, described, predicted, and explained with models. (MS-ESS1-1)

    ESS1.B: Earth and the Solar System

    • Earth’s spin axis is fixed in direction over the short-term but tilted relative to its orbit around the sun. The seasons are a result of that tilt and are caused by the differential intensity of sunlight on different areas of Earth across the year. (MS-ESS1-1)

Common Core

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3

    Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4

    Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

Benchmarks for Science Literacy

  • 4B/M5

    The moon’s orbit around the earth once in about 28 days changes what part of the moon is lighted by the sun and how much of that part can be seen from the earth—the phases of the moon.
  • 4B/M12

    The temperature of a place on the earth’s surface tends to rise and fall in a somewhat predictable pattern every day and over the course of a year. The pattern of temperature changes observed in a place tends to vary depending on how far north or south of the equator the place is, how near to oceans it is, and how high above sea level it is.
  • 4B/M13

    The number of hours of daylight and the intensity of the sunlight both vary in a predictable pattern that depends on how far north or south of the equator the place is. This variation explains why temperatures vary over the course of the year and at different locations.
  • 4B/M15

    The atmosphere is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, and trace amounts of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and other gases. (NSES)

 

The Counting Kingdom

Common Core

  • CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.A.1

    Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
  • CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.A.2

    Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20, e.g., by using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
  • CCSS.Math.Content.1.OA.C.6

    Add and subtract within 20, demonstrating fluency for addition and subtraction within 10. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13).
  • CCSS.Math.Content.2.NBT.B.5

    Fluently add and subtract within 100 using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
  • CCSS.Math.Content.2.OA.B.2

    Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies. By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.

 

Bongo Balance

Next Generation Science Standards

  • MS-PS1-5

    Develop and use a model to describe how the total number of atoms does not change in a chemical reaction and thus mass is conserved.
  • PS1.B: Chemical Reactions

    • Substances react chemically in characteristic ways. In a chemical process, the atoms that make up the original substances are regrouped into different molecules, and these new substances have different properties from those of the reactants. (MS-PS1-2) (MS-PS1-3) (MS-PS1-5)
    • The total number of each type of atom is conserved, and thus the mass does not change. (MS-PS1-5)

Common Core

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3

    Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4

    Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.7

    Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually.
  • CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.B.3

    Solve real-life and mathematical problems using numerical and algebraic expressions and equations.

Benchmarks for Science Literacy

  • 4D/M7a

    No matter how substances within a closed system interact with one another, or how they combine or break apart, the total mass of the system remains the same.
  • 4D/M7b

    The idea of atoms explains the conservation of matter: If the number of atoms stays the same no matter how the same atoms are rearranged, then their total mass stays the same.
  • 4D/M13

    The idea of atoms explains chemical reactions: When substances interact to form new substances, the atoms that make up the molecules of the original substances combine in new ways.

 

Molecubes

Next Generation Science Standards

  • MS-PS1-2

    Analyze and interpret data on the properties of substances before and after the substances interact to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.
  • MS-PS1-4

    Develop a model that predicts and describes changes in particle motion, temperature, and state of a pure substance when thermal energy is added or removed.
  • MS-PS1-6

    Undertake a design project to construct, test, and modify a device that either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical processes.
  • PS1.A: Structure and Properties of Matter

    • Each pure substance has characteristic physical and chemical properties (for any bulk quantity under given conditions) that can be used to identify it.
    • Gases and liquids are made of molecules or inert atoms that are moving about relative to each other.
    • In a liquid, the molecules are constantly in contact with others; in a gas, they are widely spaced except when they happen to collide. In a solid, atoms are closely spaced and may vibrate in position but do not change relative locations.
    • The changes of state that occur with variations in temperature or pressure can be described and predicted using these models of matter.

    PS1.B: Chemical Reactions

    • Substances react chemically in characteristic ways. In a chemical process, the atoms that make up the original substances are regrouped into different molecules, and these new substances have different properties from those of the reactants.
    • Some chemical reactions release energy; others store energy.

Common Core

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3

    Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4

    Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

Benchmarks for Science Literacy

  • 4D/M8

    Most substances can exist as a solid, liquid, or gas depending on temperature.
  • 4D/M9

    Materials vary in how they respond to electric currents, magnetic forces, and visible light or other electromagnetic waves.
  • 4D/M10

    A substance has characteristic properties such as density, a boiling point, and solubility, all of which are independent of the amount of the substance and can be used to identify it.
  • 4D/M11

    Substances react chemically in characteristic ways with other substances to form new substances with different characteristic properties.

 

Prisoner of Echo

Next Generation Science Standards

  • MS-PS4-2

    Develop and use a model to describe that waves are reflected, absorbed, or transmitted through various materials.
  • PS4.A: Wave Properties

    • A sound wave needs a medium through which it is transmitted.

Common Core

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.3

    Follow precisely a multistep procedure when carrying out experiments, taking measurements, or performing technical tasks.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4

    Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.

Benchmarks for Science Literacy

  • 4F/M4

    Vibrations in materials set up wavelike disturbances that spread away from the source. Sound and earthquake waves are examples. These and other waves move at different speeds in different materials.

 

Diffission

Common Core

 

BrainQuake Math

Common Core

  • CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.OA.B.4

    Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is prime or composite.
  • CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.OA.C.5

    Generate a number or shape pattern that follows a given rule. Identify apparent features of the pattern that were not explicit in the rule itself. For example, given the rule "Add 3" and the starting number 1, generate terms in the resulting sequence and observe that the terms appear to alternate between odd and even numbers. Explain informally why the numbers will continue to alternate in this way.
  • CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.6.NS.B.4

    Find the greatest common factor of two whole numbers less than or equal to 100 and the least common multiple of two whole numbers less than or equal to 12. Use the distributive property to express a sum of two whole numbers 1-100 with a common factor as a multiple of a sum of two whole numbers with no common factor. For example, express 36 + 8 as 4 (9 + 2).
  • CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.6.NS.C.5

    Understand that positive and negative numbers are used together to describe quantities having opposite directions or values (e.g., temperature above/below zero, elevation above/below sea level, credits/debits, positive/negative electric charge); use positive and negative numbers to represent quantities in real-world contexts, explaining the meaning of 0 in each situation.

 

Sleep Furiously EDU

Common Core

 

Letter Quest EDU

Common Core